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Dose-dependent activation of immune function in mice by ingestion of Maharishi Amrit Kalash 4

An Erratum to this article was published on 01 April 1998

Abstract

This study was carried out to evaluate the dose-effects of ingestion of Maharishi Amrit Kalash 4 (MAK 4), an ayurvedic food supplement, on the immune function in female inbred BALB/c mice. Superoxide anion (O2) production of peritoneal macrophages and the response of spleen cells to concanavalin A (Con A) were examined in mice given MAK 4 by gastric intubation of an aqueous emulsion at the dose of 10, 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg once a day for 20 days. Glucose consumption of peritoneal macrophage in the MAK 4-treated mice at the doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg after not only 24-hour but also 48-hour incubations were significantly high compared with the control group. Glucose consumption of peritoneal macrophages in the MAK 4-treated mice at the doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg after 48 hours of incubation were significantly lower than that of the control group. O2 production in the absence of a stimulator was significantly enhanced in the MAK 4-treated groups at the doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg. On the other hand, O2 production in the presence of a stimulator was significantly high in the MAK 4-treated groups at the doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg, and was significantly low in the MAK 4-treated groups at the doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg compared with that in the control group. Activities of acid phosphatase in the peritoneal macrophages were significantly low in the MAK 4-treated groups at the doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg compared with those in the control group. Activities of β -glucuronidase (GLU) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the peritoneal macrophages were significantly increased in the MAK 4-treated mice at the doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg. GLU and LDH activities of peritoneal macrophages in the MAK 4-treated mice at the doses of 100 and 200 mg /kg were significantly low compared with those in the control group. MAK 4 did not enhance spontaneous splenic lymphocyte proliferation at any dose in mice. Stimulation indices in the MAK 4-treated groups at all doses were significantly higher than those of the control group. These results indicate that 10 and 50 mg/kg per day might be appropriate doses to enhance not only macrophage function but also lymphocyte responsiveness for the gastric intubation of MAK 4 in mice.

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An erratum to this article is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02931242.

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Inaba, R., Sugiura, H., Iwata, H. et al. Dose-dependent activation of immune function in mice by ingestion of Maharishi Amrit Kalash 4. Environ Health Prev Med 2, 126–131 (1997). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02931978

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02931978

Key words

  • Ayurvedic food supplement
  • Immune function
  • Dose-effect
  • Macrophage
  • Splenocyte